Big Bang Science News

September 13, 2012 at 2:35 pm | Posted in Big Bang, Regular Feature, Science News | Leave a comment
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Today NASA honored Neil Armstrong at the National Cathedral, and the first man on the moon was remembered for his “Courage, Grace and Humility”.  Armstrong’s fellow Apollo 11 crewmates, Michael Collins and Buzz Aldrin attended, as well as the first American to orbit the earth, John Glenn.  Fellow Apollo program astronaut and the last man to walk on the moon, Gene Cernan, paid tribute to Neil Armstrong.  Cernan’s tribute included the following:

“He knew who he was and he understood the immensity of what he had done. Yet Neil was always willing to give of himself,” said Cernan, who told of trips that he, Armstrong and Apollo 13 commander Jim Lovell made to visit troops in Afghanistan and Iraq.

“Those young men and women, who had yet to be born when Neil walked on the moon, greeted him with enthusiasm,” said Cernan. “They asked him, ‘Why are you here?’ Neil’s honest and thoughtful reply was, ‘Because you are here’.”

For more coverage of the Memorial to Armstrong continue reading here on the NASA website.

Continue Reading Big Bang Science News…

Eye on the Sky: 9-11-2001

September 11, 2012 at 3:00 pm | Posted in Eye on the Sky, Miscellaneous, Regular Feature, Science News | Leave a comment
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Taken by Station Commander Frank Culbertson of Expedition 3, this photo (visible from space) shows the smoke rising from the twin towers of the World Trade Center on that morning in September.  Culbertson perhaps summed up America’s feelings in this statement:

“The world changed today. What I say or do is very minor compared to the significance of what happened to our country today when it was attacked.”

Image credit: NASA

(via NASA)

Posted by Synlah for Roqoo Depot

Eye on the Sky: 30 Doradus Nebula

September 4, 2012 at 12:00 pm | Posted in Eye on the Sky, Miscellaneous, Regular Feature, Science News | Leave a comment
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30 Doradus Nebula has been an active star-forming region for 25 million years.  Using data from Hubble astronomers first thought they were seeing one star cluster, but then realized they were actually viewing two merging clusters.  The Hubble observations were made with the Wide Field Camera 3.  The blue color is light from the hottest, most massive stars; the green from the glow of oxygen; and the red from fluorescing hydrogen.

Image credit: NASA, ESA, and E. Sabbi (ESA/STScI)

(via: NASA)

Posted by Synlah for Roqoo Depot

 

 

Big Bang Science News

August 30, 2012 at 2:24 pm | Posted in Science News | Leave a comment
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Lucky us.  A couple of planetary scientists in St. Louis have proven, with computer simulations, that planets can actually be vaporized.  That gleeful noise you hear is Grand Moff Tarkin cackling.  Discovery News has the full story here.

When you’re the most populated country on this planet I’m not sure building the world’s largest battery is a wise use of space, but the Chinese have done just that.  It’s a 36-megawatt-hour monster and the Chinese didn’t end it with that.  It’s hooked into 140 megawatts of wind and solar power.  Still, I guess there’s one benefit of a battery this size; it’s going to be pretty hard to misplace it.  PopSci has a full report on the project. Continue Reading Big Bang Science News…

Eye on the Sky: Cygnus

August 28, 2012 at 9:57 am | Posted in Astronomy, Eye on the Sky, Regular Feature | Leave a comment
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If you look in the northern hemisphere’s summertime sky, you’ll see the lovely swan winging through the night.  This image of Cygnus-X ( a giant star-forming region in the Milky Way) was captured by the Herschel Telescope with combined infrared data.  Herschel is a European Space Agency mission.  Its science instruments are provided by a consortia of European institutes, and NASA is a participant in Herschel.

(Via NASA)

Posted by Synlah for Roqoo Depot

Big Bang: News in Science

August 23, 2012 at 2:23 pm | Posted in Miscellaneous, Regular Feature, Science News | Leave a comment
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Hubble spots an ancient galaxy that shouldn’t exist.  According to i09:

“It’s called a “grand-design” spiral galaxy, and unlike most galaxies of its kind, this one is old. Like, really, really old. According to a new study conducted by researchers using NASA’s Hubble Telescope, it dates back roughly 10.7-billion years — and that makes it the most ancient spiral galaxy we’ve ever discovered.”

Per i09, this galaxy is super weird, and you can read why right here.

NASA and Wired both tell us that the U.S. drought is so bad you can see it from space.  In fact it’s so bad that an 11-mile stretch of the Mississippi river has been closed off and on since August 11.  Wired has the full story complete with NASA images that you can view here.

Ion crystal quantum computer may be on the horizon.  And it has the potential to beat the computational capacity of any machine by 10 to the 80th power.  That’s a heck of a computer.  In case you don’t have a grasp of the significance of this (or just don’t know what 10 to the 80th is), Huff Post Science is happy to explain it to you.

Finally, in the truth-is-stranger-than-fiction catgory, scientists have discovered a lost world under Antarctica, according to Gizmodo.

Entire colonies of unknown yeti crabs, anemones, predatory sea stars with seven arms and pale octopus were found, piling on top of the (hydrothermal) vents, creeping on top of each other, at nearly 7,874 feet (2,400 meters) under the surface of the Southern Ocean.

To find out how these creatures get their energy from the hydrothermal vents (very interesting), and exactly how hot these vents can get, you can read the entire article here.

Posted by Synlah for Roqoo Depot

The Grand Entrance of Curiosity, the Mars Rover (as told by William Shatner)

August 2, 2012 at 12:14 pm | Posted in Regular Feature, Science News | Leave a comment
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In this entertaining and informative video, William Shatner explains the Mars rover, Curiosity; how she got there, and how she works.  And, yes, Curiosity is a she.

(via Geek Tyrant)

Posted by Synlah for Roqoo Depot

Eye on the Sky: Solar Flare

May 15, 2012 at 9:44 am | Posted in Eye on the Sky, Regular Feature, Science News | 1 Comment
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Bring on the Mayan doomsday predictions.  NASA’s SDO (Solar Dynamics Observatory) captured this M-class solar flare on March 13, at 1:29 p.m. EDT.   Solar flares are classed in three categories: X- M- and C-, and solar flares are the strongest explosive event in our solar system, so this was a medium.  Incidentally, the teal color is normal for the Angstrom wavelength being shown in this image.  The magnetic energy put out by an M-class flare can cause brief radio blackouts that affect the Earth’s polar regions.

(via NASA)

Posted by Synlah for Roqoo Depot


Eye on the Sky: Stellar Clouds

May 1, 2012 at 9:34 am | Posted in Astronomy, Eye on the Sky, Regular Feature | Leave a comment
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This image of the Large Magellanic Cloud (dwarf satellite galaxy of the Milky Way) was taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope’s Wide Field Planetary Camera 2.  This loose star cluster — known as a stellar grouping — is classified as an OB association.  OB’s usually contain 10-100 high mass stars with brilliant but short lives.  Speculations is that most of the Milky Way’s stars were created in OB associations.

Posted by Synlah for Roqoo Depot

Eye on the Sky: UFO Galaxy

April 26, 2012 at 9:28 am | Posted in Eye on the Sky, Regular Feature, Science News | Leave a comment
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Captured in visible and infrared light by Hubble’s Advanced Camera for Surveys, the UFO Galaxy image (NGC 2683) is a side-on view, giving the galaxy it’s distinctive nickname.  It looks like the classic sci-fi image of an alien ship.  UFO is, like our own, a spiral galaxy, and this view of it allows astronomers to see details like dusty space lanes and clusters of young blue stars in the galaxy’s star-forming regions.

(Via NASA)

Posted by Synlah for Roqoo Depot


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